Advanced Malware Detection Tag

Understanding how malware works, and in particular, the strategies and tactics most often used by malware authors is vitally important for cybersecurity professionals. In other blog posts, Lastline provides a brief history of malware and basic malware types. In this post, we’ll look at some...

Infected PDF files continue to plague security personnel responsible for detecting and containing malicious email attachments. Cybercriminals use many different tactics to breach an organization’s network defenses, and delivering infected PDF files, typically via email, remains a very common and dangerous threat. Unfortunately, Secure Email Gateways...

When your company is under cyber attack — knowing your assailant’s next move can protect you from the next data breach. Wikipedia defines a cyber attack as " . . . any type of offensive maneuver employed by nation-states, individuals, groups, or organizations that targets computer information...

Machine Learning is an important component in detecting advanced malware, but to be effective it must be well-grounded with known threat intelligence. Dr. Giovanni Vigna, Co-founder and CTO of Lastline, presented his thoughts regarding advanced malware protection at this year’s RSA conference in San Francisco. He...

Lastline’s unique architecture protects organizations from advanced fileless malware. Last week at the RSA security conference, Christopher Kruegel, Lastline co-founder and CEO, gave a remarkable presentation about detecting fileless web threats—a new capability present in the spring 2017 release of Lastline Enterprise. During his presentation, Kruegel...

Lastline's new release of our flagship product, Lastline Enterprise adds a number of capabilities, including early warning of unusual or suspicious network activity, detection of browser-based attacks, and accelerated incident investigation. Lastline's New 2017 Release It’s always an exciting event when we announce a new version of...

Ransomware hits both individuals and businesses, but businesses are being targeted more than ever, and end up paying significantly higher ransoms—often tens of thousands of dollars. This week, Los Angeles Valley College disclosed that it paid $28,000 in ransom to hackers who had used malicious software...